Education

Produced and managed by Another Space, an education charity based in Cumbria, the LDHP has progressed enormously since it began in 2005. The project has evolved to provide a hugely important and significant contribution to the historical and cultural sphere in the Lake District and especially in the field of Holocaust education. Its work in Cumbria, northwest England and nationally is unique. It holds a comprehensive archive of documents, photographs and oral history testimonies that tell both the story of the arrival of the Jewish children and also of the community who welcomed them.

It is uniquely successful in ensuring that the teaching of the Holocaust remains relevant to people young and old, be they in schools, community centres, social spaces or visitors to the Lake District. The work of the LDHP seeks to ensure that the lessons of the Holocaust are taught at the heart of the community and applies the lessons to everyday situations.

It develops projects locally, nationally and internationally that focus on tolerance, inclusion and understanding between individuals and cultures.

The Lake District Holocaust Project organises visits for primary and secondary schools to the exhibition in Windermere Library and to the former site of the Calgarth Estate where the children arrived in 1945 and have run a variety of workshops with direct reference to the child Holocaust survivors’ story.

The Project frequently receives requests, not only from schools, but also from national and international University Research students.

Alfred Huberman Writing Award

LDHP collated the large number of entries for the writing award from primary and secondary students at schools in the South Lakes, and further afield in Esher & Brighton.  The winners were announced on 20th July 2017.

Trevor Avery, Fiona Kay, Rose Smith & Nicki Smith from LDHP visited several primary and secondary schools to talk about the award, the Holocaust and Alfred Huberman’s story.

Alfred Huberman

Alfred Huberman

Prizewinners

A full list of prizewinners can be found at
www.alfredhuberman.com

The first prize for the Secondary School entries was awarded to Isabel Hughes from Queen Elizabeth School,  Kirby Lonsdale. Catherine liked “how it’s called ‘Falling glass’ rather than ‘Kristallnacht’, so doesn’t give too much away at first. The structure is strong, and the poem perfectly balanced. It avoids the over-writing that weakened some other entries. Good poetry is memorable. I’m going to remember this one.”

Falling glass

A girl,
Outlined against the wooden door,
Crying as her father is dragged down the street, Forced to parade in silent rows,
As bystanders laugh and scorn.

A boy,
A lonely figure, isolated from the world, Standing, small, against a playground wall, Mocked by those he once called friends, Bullied for something he couldn’t change, Fed lies by those he looked up to.

An old man,
Dark against the raging fire,
Silent as the place that once filled him with hope falls to ashes, Fragments of glass once a picture of beauty,
Now portray destruction.

A couple,
A silhouette in the evening light,
Surveying their home,
Their safe haven, ruined before their eyes,
Wood, cloth and glass scattered on the bare boards, Remnants of a life they once had.

A family,
Separated, lost,
crying for each other,
boarded onto trains,
Wondering when they might see each other again, A clouded future.

Me,
Sitting contemplating,
Thinking of horrors past, knowing it could have been me, The only difference,
One man’s hate and another’s fear,
Though history shattered like glass can’t be repaired, Through past mistakes we learn,
Hoping no lives are destroyed like these again.

 

Some of the primary school children were encouraged to write a letter to Alfred, describing how his story, and the acts of kindness shown him, affected them.  The winning entry was by Thomas Twydell from Milbourne Lodge School in Esher. Catherine said that “Tom’s opening sentence is pure poetry: “It makes me take a moment and breath in this world because I know this world is a better place now.” And later in his letter, he has a lovely, moving sentence”.

Dear Mr Huberman,

It makes me take A moment and breathe in this world because I know this world is a better place now.

You are a hero, so smart, so brave and just amazing. When my teacher was speaking about you in class your life must have been such an adventure, from being cleverest in school with a lovely family, four sisters, two caring parents and then all those years of concentration camp it must have been horrible then rushed onto a plane to a strange country with strange people and then taken to in your words “paradise”.

If you were still alive I would invite you for some tea and biscuits but this time you don’t have to hide it under the table.

Your story has made me be more kind to others.

 

Over seven hundred children, staff and guests at the Lakes School had seen the launch of the Alfred Huberman Writing Award for schools as part of the HMD 2016 commemorations.  Alfred Huberman’s wife Shirley and their daughter Caroline travelled from Brighton and were at the event. They spoke movingly of their father and of his time both at Windermere and his later life. The family has been very supportive of the LDHP and their support has enabled the writing Award initiative.  They see it as a perfect way to continue Alfred’s work as he spoke to many students during his lifetime about the Holocaust.

Further details are available at
www.alfredhuberman.com

Councillor Sylvia Emmott, Deputy Head Mick Gallop, Caroline & Shirley Huberman & Trevor Avery

Research Student Visits

A group of MA students from the Department of Holocaust Studies at the Royal Holloway, University of London visited both the permanent exhibition and the Auschwitz Dandelion exhibition in the adjoining gallery.

MA students with Trevor Avery in the permanent exhibition gallery

At the Auschwitz Dandelion exhibition

 

School Visits

We were delighted to welcome a further visit by this year’s Furness Academy Year 8 students to the exhibition at LDHP, Windermere in early February.  The students were also given the opportunity to study a recently donated copy of the registration form for Alfred Huberman when he arrived at the Calgarth Estate in 1945.

Students examining a copy of the registration form

Students examining a copy of the registration form

Trevor explaining about the story of Calgarth Estate and the exhibition in Windermere

Trevor explaining about the story of Calgarth Estate and the exhibition in Windermere

The group of students at the Lakes School

The group of students at the Lakes School

Comments made after the last visit by Furness Academy Year 8 students to both the exhibition and the former sites of Calgarth Estate and the Sunderland Flying Boat Factory, illustrated how important this was to them:

I am writing to inform you how grateful I am for you providing such an experience in Windermere. The best part was actually the whole thing. I learned loads! Honestly it was the best trip by far. I personally think that everyone should go on it no matter what age….

We would like to thank you both for the tour around Windermere Library and around Lakes School. The fact that it was free was amazing! And we appreciated that you took time out of your busy day. There were just so many memorable moments I cannot choose!

Showing where the child Survivors had stayed on the former Calgarth Estate

Trevor explaining where the child Survivors had stayed on the former Calgarth Estate

Outside the Lakes School built on the former site of Calgarth Estate. Trevor describing the results of the geo-physics scan by John Gater from Time Team.

Outside the Lakes School built on the former site of Calgarth Estate. Trevor describing the results of the geo-physics scan by John Gater from Time Team.

Next to the field where the hostels were originally sited. This is behind the Lakes School.

Next to the field where the hostels were originally sited. This is behind the Lakes School.

 

Important links with the child Holocaust Survivors and the Second Generation are expanded to offer a vital, inspirational and ongoing success story of how a group of young people triumphed over unimaginable adversity.

Crucially, between 2006 and 2014 over 3500 children have heard a Holocaust Survivor at first hand during Holocaust Study Days and talks in schools in Cumbria and north Lancashire.

The following is a short excerpt from a film made at The Lakes School where Mayer Hersh talked about his story to older children.

And in this clip, Mayer is talking about how he was made to feel welcome in this country. Jack Aizenberg, another Survivor, is seated to his left.

Another Holocaust Survivor, Arek Hersh, also visited The Lakes School and in this clip he reminisces about his stay at Windermere in August 1945.

Films by Rosemary Smith

 

Ongoing children’s arts projects include the visual arts, music and writing and including:

“The Paradise Project” involved 400 children from South Lakeland and Poland who produced paintings on canvas to celebrate the connection between the Lakes and 300 Holocaust Survivors. They painted their version of ‘Paradise’ in response to the very same description used by the child Survivors on their arrival in the Lakes in 1945.

This is a photograph of art worker Nicki Smith working with primary level children. Nicki is one of a network of providers who introduce school children to the story of the Jewish children and introduce the students to concepts such as the importance of tolerance, inclusion and mutual respect.

Nicki in school a

One of the paintings from the workshop

One of the paintings from the workshop

 

“The Paradise Route” involved children from three primary schools in South Lakeland who created artworks as gifts for each other and were inspired by the tolerance, understanding and empathy of the child Survivors.

Trevor Avery looking at the exhibition of photographs from the project in Windermere Library

Trevor Avery looking at the exhibition of photographs from the project in Windermere Library

This project was led by Nicki Smith

This project was led by Nicki Smith

Some of the gifts

Some of the gifts

 

The “Butterfly Suite” concert took place in July 2013 in the grounds of the Lake District Holocaust Project and Windermere Library.

The project was led by MusicLinks, together with the new Music Hub and facilitated by LDHP. Special thanks to the Director of MusicLinks, Andy Halsey.

Participants from local schools and schools for those with special educational needs performed improvised pieces, newly composed songs and solo performances. Thanks also to Yosef and Ahsha Oxenhandler for performing.

The preceding workshops took place at the following schools: Sandgate, The Lakes, Whinfell, St. Cuthberts, and St Oswalds, and they explored both the story behind the symbol of the Butterfly, namely the drawings made by children and found at the Madjenek Concentration Camp and the stories of the Survivors. The focus of the workshops concentrated on composition, learning soundscapes, poetry and song together with development of artworks such as butterflies and banners from workshops with Nicki Smith.

This was a wonderful opportunity for the children to perform before an audience. They displayed a much deserved sense of achievement, both when performing as soloists and as playing and singing as part of an ensemble and they “inspired a sense of wonder and happiness”.

The following piece was compiled from a recording by St Cuthberts, Sandgate and St Oswalds Primary Schools

This poem was performed by children from St Oswalds Primary School

A final excerpt from a jamming session at Whinfell School

Photographs were taken on site by Rosemary Smith

Andy Halsey leading with guitar

Andy Halsey leading with guitar

 

Children enjoying the performance

Children enjoying the performance

 

Performers from the Lakes School, Troutbeck Bridge

Performers from the Lakes School, Troutbeck Bridge

 

Joining in the singing

Joining in the singing

 

Yosef and Ahsha Oxenhandler

Yosef and Ahsha Oxenhandler

 

Paintings from the schools

Paintings from the schools

Print

Janusz Korczak

An Exhibition “Champion of the Child – Janusz Korczak” displayed banners giving details of Janusz Korczak’s extraordinary life and legacy.

Korczak was a Polish Jewish Educator (1989-1942). He devoted his life to the needs and plight of children regardless of nationality and religion, even to the point of refusing to abandon his Jewish orphans when they were taken to Warsaw Ghetto and then to the death camps of Treblinka in 1942. He refused to desert them so that even as they died the children would be able to maintain their trust in him.

He wrote passionately about the subject of children’s rights and his ideas were adopted by the UN in the Children’s Human Rights Declaration of 1959.

Visitors reading the banners at the exhibition

Visitors reading the banners at the exhibition